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Peter Schiff: “Washington is the Biggest National Security Threat”

by on August 30, 2012 in Economy, Featured, Most Read

Peter Schiff: “Washington is the Biggest National Security Threat”

Despite the seemingly endless string articles citing Iran as an existential threat to both Israel and the United States there is concurrently a growing and more compelling consensus forming: that US national debt and Washington’s profligate spending is actually more threatening than an ostensible Iranian nuclear weapons program.  As of right now we definitely have more evidence of the former.

Last year after Congress failed at agreeing on a long term debt reduction strategy, instead its deliberations gave birth to something our founders would hardly recognize as an enumerated power – the Super Congress.  Rather than broach the subject of any real cuts the debt deal merely slowed the pace of growth and effectively kicked the proverbial can down the road.  The debt ceiling was raised, this year our deficit for the 4th year in a row amounted to the total GDP of Africa and a recent study has shown by 2016 our debt with be a colossal $16 trillion.

This year, however, our media has been entirely preoccupied with the mounting debt crisis in Europe, after all there is nothing quite like lamenting someone elses woes than address your own.  Its almost as if we’ve reverted to some time in the past where everyone’s problems were wholly theirs and not our own.  This fantasy has been indulged for far too long.

Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, expressed his concern last year: “I’ve said many times that I believe the single, biggest threat to our national security is our debt, so I also believe we have every responsibility to help eliminate that threat.”  Congressman Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) acknowledged the same earlier this year reports the Rotor & Wing Magazine: “…we face a very significant challenge, and we’re going to have to work hard to be up to that challenge,” Brooks said. “We’ve had three consecutive trillion-dollar deficits [and are] looking at a fourth trillion-dollar deficit this year—those are unsustainable and they’re threats to our country.”

Richard Haas, president of the Council on Foreign Relations also cited our immense debt burden as the real danger facing the Republic reports Yahoo News: “The most important national security question for the coming year is actually the domestic set of issues that involves the economy.”  Not once do these experts of foreign policy admit however that deficits we see mounting in front of our eyes are due to maintaining our overseas empire.  Condelezza Rice last night at the RNC claimed our voice is “muted” in international affairs under President Barack Obama.  If money truly does talk and considering how much money we spend overseas it is hard to see how this can be true.  Last year Bruce Fein, senior advisor to Ron Paul’s campaign and Constitutional Scholar attempted to rebuke such assertions that domestic entitlement spending is the true villian.  He argued profligate spending has corrupted both domestic and foreign policy spheres, and shows how our foreign policy apparatus is in fact a massive entitlement in and of itself.

In an interview with AMTV’s Christopher Greene on Wednesday, Peter Schiff echoed the sentiments of the foreign policy hawks, however, reminded them that without a sound monetary system and reducing spending we cannot sustain our military might:

TopherMorrison

Topher Morrison is the editor and a regular contributor at GreeneWave and creator of his own blog at PurpleSerf.com. He holds B.A.s in Political Science and Philosophy from Arizona State University. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

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